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Last updated : 11/03/2007

This page is indexed on our home page under Aspect: 8. Links - Species Specific and the Section: Lizards: Monitors


Species page for: Nile Monitor (Varanus niloticus)


Introduction

This page contains a selection of the best links found on the reptile species: Nile Monitor (Varanus niloticus). The navigation table on the top left will take you directly to the defined topics, such as  Natural Habitat, Captive care, Breeders, Pictures, More information, Other information and Taxonomy.


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A brief snippet about Nile

A brief introduction to the species will be inserted here ..... coming soon! In the interim we have a number of links on the species, listed on this page.

 




 
Natural Habitat
Animal.discovery.com - Nile Monitor Lizard: Stats & Facts

Varanus niloticus There are two variations of Nile Monitors in the wild. They are the V. niloticus (Nile Monitor), and V. niloticus ornatus (Ornate Nile Monitor). The Nile Monitor has five torso bands, while the Ornate Nile has seven.

Honoluluzoo.org - Nile Monitor

Monitors belong to the family Varanidae. Some are small reptiles of less than a foot in length, while the Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, grows to 364 lb. All monitors are tropical reptiles. They are active lizards, that may be very hostile, lashing out with their tails upon the slightest provocation. Even a small monitor can produce a stinging lash with its tail.

Monitors of Africa

MONITORS - Giants among Lizards About forty species of monitor lizards are found from Africa, through India and south-east Asia to Australia. The genus to which monitors all belong - Varanus - contains the world's largest lizard, the much-feared Komodo Dragon from Indonesia which may reach three metres in length and has been known to prey on humans.

Nile monitor by Daniel Bennett

The Nile monitor is the largest lizard in Africa and also one of the most widespread. It is known from all parts of Africa except desert regions (Mertens 1942, Luxmoore et al 1988). More than a hundred years ago Nile monitors were reported to live in Palestine (Tristram 1888). V.griseus is the only monitor found there now but the two species are so different that it would be very difficult to confuse them. Perhaps the Nile monitor once lived along the banks of the Jordan River, but today it seems almost certain that they are restricted to the African continent.

Wildherps

This marvellous monitor was draped over some sort of nest high up in an acacia tree. I suspect it had recently devoured the contents of the nest and was taking a hard-earned rest. Tragically, I didn't steady my camera well for the 400mm hand-held shots on slow film, with the massively fuzzy results displayed here. I shoulda known better. (This picture is cropped to about 1/4 the content of the full frame.)

wildherps.com - Nile Monitor (Varanus niloticus)

This marvellous monitor was draped over some sort of nest high up in an acacia tree. I suspect it had recently devoured the contents of the nest and was taking a hard-earned rest. Tragically, I didn't steady my camera well for the 400mm hand-held shots on slow film, with the massively fuzzy results displayed here. I shoulda known better. (This picture is cropped to about 1/4 the content of the full frame.)


 
Captive Care
Caring for Your New Nile Monitor - Aqualandpetsplus.com

Honkers: Those cute snake-tongued guys grow into huge honker lizards that eventually need their own room. You can keep baby Nile monitors in aquariums for a while, but these guys will all need a bathtub-sized swimming pool when fully grown. These are definitely not a lizard for youngsters to keep.

Nile Monitor - Melissa Kaplan

The Nile monitor (Varanus niloticus) is distributed across most of Africa, except the northwest. It can get up to 7 feet (2.1 meters), but averages 4.5-5.5 feet (1.5-1.8 meters). This species is extremely hardy in captivity when properly maintained. Wild caught animals should be checked for internal parasites. The Nile monitor has a very aggressive temperament with a powerful bite and a lashing tail. With a lot of patience, frequent handling, and a well stocked first aid kit, Nile monitors can be tamed. Babies and small juveniles are recommended to start with as they are easier to tame.

Nile Nile Monitor Care Sheet and Information - wnyherp

Note: Nile monitors are illegal to own in New York State without a license. If you need to look at a care sheet for this species, you should think twice about owning a Nile Monitor: These are large, powerful lizards that almost never calm down. Their paranoid attitude leads them to see their keepers as threats all their lives, and they have no hesitation about defending themselves with blows from their tail, ripping with their talons, or bone-crushing bites from their vice like jaws - not to mention projectile defecation on their perceived aggressors. Almost any other monitor species (with the exception of the Komodo dragon) is better suited as a pet.

 

Nile Monitor fact sheet - PetReptiles

Reptileguru


 
Pictures
Natureswindow.dk - excellent photos

Nile Monitor (Varanus niloticus) Photos - Naturephoto-cz.com


 
More Info.
CITES info and picture

Common name: African Small-grain Lizard, Water Monitor, Nile Monitor Scientific name: Varanus niloticus Distribution: Africa CITES listing: Appendix II (01/07/1975) Photo: Peter Dollinger (Taken at Chobe National Park, Botswana)


 
Other Info.
Florida's Exotic Wildlife. Species detail.

Established status: Populations are confirmed breeding and apparently self-sustaining for 10 or more consecutive years. Estimated Florida range: 1 county At least 10 years, 6 counties Not reported breeding Statewide trend: Unknown status


 

We have many other species documented in similar fashion which are listed on our home page, in the 8. Links - Species Specific section.

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Last updated : 13-01-2008